Lucerne pasture: The king of fodder crops

Farmers that include lucerne as part of their pasture mixtures will benefit from free nitrogen both from the atmosphere and from an enhanced mineralisation rate that will be stimulated by diverse pastures. The free nitrogen will help reduce fertiliser costs and improve farm efficiency.

Do you ever examine your soil?

These two very simple visual assessments can give farmers an idea of how good the structure of the soil is on their farms. They are also a good demonstration of the benefits of soil carbon and how carbon contributes to well aggregated soil.

Can you afford not to change?

The problem with change is that it is often very challenging. The usual, common and standard way of doing things is comfortable and known, but it very seldom brings about progress.

Upside down thinking

An upside down way of thinking, as with regenerative agriculture, is to start with the soil. Read this blog to find out more about this upside down thinking.

Who are the real environmentalists?

There are many farmers out there who are really attempting to reduce their environmental impacts and provide agricultural produce which supports a sustainable future.

Mycorrhizal fungi: The plant’s secondary root system

The relationship between plant roots and mycorrhizae is often reduced to just the exchange of nutrients and water, but the relationship goes much deeper. Read this blog to find out about other benefits of this mutualistic relationship.

Happy soil life, happy grass, happy cows

Is there a link between regenerative agricultural practices and the idea of happy soil life, happy grass, happy cows? Read this blog to find out more.

Chickens on pastures

Raising chickens on pasture has many benefits which include improved soil health, improved pasture health, and improved chicken health – which improves the health of the produce, be it meat or eggs. Read this blog to find out how this is archived.

The potassium problem, or is it a nitrogen problem?

Due to a lack of soil health, and an imbalance in soil fertility, farmers are relying for too heavily on nitrogen fertiliser for pasture growth. This can actually lead to potassium loss from the soil.

Body builders and milk flocculation association

This article will demonstrate that milk flocculation is caused by calcium instability which is induced by excess potassium on pasture systems.  Also contributing is rumen pH fluctuations caused by rumen acidity or alkalinity due to sudden nutritional changes.